Dreadnought

Location
Greenwich
Client
University of Greenwich

The project consisted of the demolition of the central courtyard 2 storey glazed structure and the asbestos removal to the basement of the listed Dreadnought building.

The Dreadnought building was originally constructed (1764-68) by Greenwich Hospital as its infirmary for treating sick Greenwich Pensioners. The central corridor connecting the two wings contained historical items including two 18th century lanterns, which would have been originally lit using fish or whale oil. These items required careful protection and removal for safe storage.

The Dreadnought building required protection to all internal faces to enable the demolition of the internal courtyard. Due to the heritage status of the building, all of the glazed panels had to be carefully removed by hand and lowered using mechanical aids. Hot works were not allowed to be used due to the conditions implemented by Heritage England, so the internal steel structure had to be dismantled unbolting every section of steel and lowered carefully to the ground. It was then transported to a safe external zone where the steels could be processed.

Once the superstructure had been removed the suspended block and beam floor was supported using props and broken out using a machine. A scaffold was then installed to the two turrets to enable the saw cutting and
dismantling from the roof to the basement.

Scope of Works at Dreadnought

  • Asbestos Removal
  • Service isolations and diversions
  • Removal of the basement plant equipment
  • Strip Out
  • Demolition of the high level link bridge
  • Demolition of the courtyard glazed structure
  • Demolition of the two turrets attached to the listed building

Latest Case Study

Dreadnought, Greenwich

Dreadnought

The project consisted of the demolition of the central courtyard 2 storey glazed structure and the asbestos removal to the basement of the listed Dreadnought building. The Dreadnought building was originally constructed (1764-68) by Greenwich Hospital as its infirmary for treating sick Greenwich Pensioners. The central corridor connecting the two wings contained historical items including … Continue reading